Isha’s review of The Scarlet Pimpernel by the Baroness Emma Orczy

51-bt9jwyqlThe novel begins in a very Tale-Of-Two-Cities-esque manner, as this book is set during the French Revolution, and the writing feels similar. It also dances around the ideas of conforming to societal norms prevalent during the Reign of Terror, in a very Tolstoy-way.

Soon, however, the story concentrates on the strained relationship between a man and a woman, and the increasing interest in France and England regarding an anonymous and controversial man, known as the Scarlet Pimpernel, who dresses in a mask and saves French Aristocrats from the guillotine. Another major part of the plot regards the apparent danger the woman’s brother is in (for helping the Pimpernel), and the woman’s internal conflict regarding whether to save her brother at the expensive of the safety and life of the anonymous hero.

I recommend this book to anyone who enjoys more classic, formal writing (as it might be frustrating to those who do not enjoy that sort of diction). As mentioned previously, it also reminded me of Tolstoy’s writing due to the sheer number of characters and their complicated web of relationships, as well as the descriptions of how high class society functions (similar to The Age of Innocence, as well).

I also recommend this to readers who enjoy mystery novels. While this book is not necessarily of mystery genre, the suspense regarding the identity of the Scarlet Pimpernel is equally thrilling.

This book would also be enjoyable to those who are fans of superheroes such as Batman and Spiderman! This book was particularly fascinating because I read elsewhere that many superhero stories such as Batman and Spiderman are all loosely based off of this novel, which was written and published in the early 1900s! While I am not necessarily an avid fan of superhero movies and comics, I am aware of the stories and watch the movies. Thus, it was fun to pick out aspects of the novel reflected in modern culture! (Hint: You can find many parallels between the symbols Batman leaves behind, and the ones the Scarlet Pimpernel utilizes, and similarities between the public opinion of the Scarlet Pimpernel and Spiderman!)

Happy Reading!

Isha rates this book 5/5

Tags: adventure, classic, French history, light romance, mystery, suspense


Review: The Finisher by David Baldacci



Vega Jane has lived in the town of Wormwood her whole life. She was always told entering the forest surrounding Wormwood was certain death, and she believed it too, until she sees Quentin Herms run into it. Or was he chased? She doesn’t know until she finds a map that could jeopardize her life. A map of the very place she was told never to enter, and for good reason. Still, Vega Jane want to leave, but will she make it to the forest of doom, or will the liars she called authority get to her first?

If you enjoy books with action and a little, but not too much, romance, then The Finisher is the book for you. The language used is a little strange, but entertaining once you catch on. If you read this book and enjoy it, there are two more books after this one, The Keeper and The Width of the World.

This reviewer ratesĀ The Finisher 5/5

Review: Hunter by Mercedes Lackey

24397041Hunter follows the story of Joyeaux Charmand, a girl who is sent from her home to a city called Apex to fight monsters in a futuristic world. Joy is a hunter, a person with magical powers that access the spirit world. Joy travels from her home to keep the city from finding the other hunters on the mountain. She discovers that hunters in the city are viewed as entertainment rather than protectors of the citizens. When her mentor gets killed in a territory that was meant for Joy, she is determined to figure out who would want to get her killed.

I would recommend Hunter to anyone who enjoys fantasy books without a lot of romance. This book is action packed with plot twists and monsters flying our of sewers at every turn. Joy is constantly on the move fighting monsters and defending herself against her rival hunters. There was never a moment when I felt like the book was moving at a slow pace. However, as a fan of romance novels, I would have liked to see her relationship with Josh better developed.

This reviewer rates the book 4.5/5

Cassandra’s review of Learning to Swear in America by Katie Kennedy

23018259Two targets are on their way to California. One is the asteroid BR1019, an asteroid big enough to destroy the West Coast. Another is Yuri Strelnikov, a seventeen year old physics prodigy. There are seventeen days before BR1019 hits home, can Yuri save the world in time? It is already hard enough without the fact that no one listens to his ideas. Just when Yuri starts to get a tad bit suicidal, he meets Dovie, a “normal”-ish teenage girl who is oblivious to the incoming danger. By spending time with her, he not only learns how to swear appropriately but also learns more about what kind of person he is and could be.

I deeply enjoyed Learning to Swear in America. Yuri is a very interesting and unique character. He is an extreme math and physics geek who is actually quite cute at times. He may be a genius, but he doesn’t know a lot of stuff about life, which Dovie slowly teaches him. Dovie is a perfect complement to Yuri. They are complete opposites of each other. The best scene in the novel is when Yuri visits a typical high school. SO FUNNY!!! If you want to read a humorous realistic fiction stand alone, then Learning to Swear in America is damn right for you! (Disclaimer: the swearing is used for emphasis only; no harm is intended.)

Cassandra rates this book 5/5